Research and Information on COVID-19 Related to Agriculture, Resource Management, and Food Supply Chains

 

The NAREA board has decided to dedicate a website for COVID-19 related issues, especially issues pertaining to our region, and is soliciting factsheets on the topic as well as any information pertaining to the impact of COVID-19 on employment and production activities including, but not limited to, agriculture, resource management, and food supply chains. The factsheets will undergo an expedited review before being posted online.
 
If you would like to contribute a factsheet on the topic, please email Gal Hochman (gal.hochman@rutgers.edu) and let him know of the topic you wish to discuss. Please also reach out to NAREA if there is specific information regarding COVID-19 that you would like us to find and place on the website.

 

 

World Needs to Keep a Close Watch on Agriculture While Battling COVID-19 Pandemic

Samarendu Mohanty

As the world fights the COVID-19 pandemic with lockdowns and shutdowns of economies globally, countries have rushed to approve economic stimulus packages to provide relief to families, small business owners and corporations. Rightfully so, the world is now fully focused on containing the pandemic, minimizing loss of life and making sure people have enough money to buy food and pay their bills. During a lockdown, agriculture is excluded from all restrictions but, when the entire economy is under a lockdown, it is a challenge for farmers to carry out farm operations. Once the pandemic is brought under control, most sectors of the economy can be kickstarted, but agricultural production has strict planting and harvesting schedules and cannot be ramped up at will.

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Factsheet on COVID-19 in Nigeria: Actions and Reactions

A.E. Obayelu & O.A. Obayelu

COVID-19 is a global disease that has come, though still prevalent, and spread across the globe, cutting across every facet of human existence and the consequences may linger beyond 2020. This pandemic has put the world on a crisis, with unprecedented actions to restrict movements and plans for radical deployment of public and private funds to combat the threat posed by the disease that knows no boundaries (FAO, 2020). The high level of uncertainty associated with the trajectory of the virus’ spread and the severity of the long term impacts at global, national, and sub-national levels, require a lot of data and information for an in-depth analysis. This fact sheet about Nigeria will form the basis upon which other subsequent data can be built.

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COVID-19 Pandemic Despair Could Reverse Agricultural Globalization

Samarendu Mohanty

The world is in the midst of a pandemic that has infected 1.50 million people and killed 89,931 so far (source: Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center, accessed on April 9, 2020). This pandemic is likely to cause many more casualties and damage when all is said and done. It has shut down economies around the world and put more than three billion people under lockdown. In this globalized planet, lockdowns and shutdowns in one part of the world (with medical, financial and food security concerns) quickly affect other parts of the world. Although globalization has had numerous benefits, including faster economic growth, higher standards of living, diversified consumption baskets and fewer people below the poverty line, many inherent risks have been exposed during the pandemic. This is particularly true for essential products such as food and health-related products such as medicine and medical equipment. According to a recent Wall Street Journal report, more than 80 countries have imposed export restrictions, including 40 with an outright ban on some medicines and medical equipment.

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The Differential Employment Risks of a Pandemic: Why Are More African-Americans Dying from COVID-19?

Belinda Archibong

There’s a saying among Black communities in the United States that when white America sneezes, Black America catches pneumonia, and, if the statistics on morbidity and mortality from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic are any indication, this saying is more literal than ever. Using statistics from 14 states in the United States that have released racial breakdowns of infection and mortality rates, African-Americans are significantly more likely to be infected and to die from COVID-19.

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